The story of Dana Yelverton – Goat Rocks Wilderness

In April of 2019, a lady named Vicki Corporon contacted me and inquired about my Goat Rocks Wilderness thru hike that I wrote about here on my blog. Vicki was on that fateful backpacking trip in 1962 when a young Dana Yelverton lost her life in a freak summer blizzard near Old Snowy Mountain and the high point of the PCT in Washington. Vicki wanted to know if she could use the images I took of what is left of the Dana Yelverton shelter so she could publish her memories about that trip in a newsletter she edits. The newsletter is called The Galley - A Clan McNeil Family Newsletter and is based on the east coast. It is an award winning genealogical magazine for the McNeil clan. I agreed to allow the use of the images, and she gave me permission to reproduce her story here.

Condolences to the family and friends of Dana Yelverton.

Thank you for sharing your story with us Vicki.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

5 thoughts on “The story of Dana Yelverton – Goat Rocks Wilderness

  • August 9, 2020 at 9:07 am
    Permalink

    Dear Jay: In 978 whilst residing in Vancouver, B.C. with a friend we hiked the PCT from Rainy Pass to Mount Hood and found the Kendal Katwalk a somewhat treacherous hike even on a clear day. I was curious about the Dana Yelverton shelter and was pleased to see it there in such an exposed location. It was interesting to recently read about the tragic happening that occurred as it was a reminder to never trust the weather when venturing into wilderness regions. Seeing the shelter in such a state makes me wonder if there are any plans to replace it?
    Your reply would be greatly appreciated. Also do you know anywhere were I might find a 1976 PCT Guide book.
    K. Mavis Wright

    K. Mavis Wright

    Reply
    • August 10, 2020 at 8:22 am
      Permalink

      Hi Mavis. I’m not sure where you’d find a 1976 guide book. I’m guessing it might be pretty hard to find.

      I’ll tell you a story, but you might find it too crazy to believe. My friend Cheryl and I started hiking the PCT from Bridge of the Gods going north back in 2013. We’re doing short weekend trips on the PCT heading North in an attempt to hike the entire trail in Washington. I still have a couple hundred miles left to do. On our very first hike, Cheryl brought her new friend Laurie who we both met on the Wonderland Trail the year before. This was the only time I ever hiked with Laurie. Fast forward to 2018 and we learned that our friend Laurie fell to her death while hiking on the PCT. She fell off the Kendall Katwalk. I’ve not publicly commented on this before but your comments about the Katwalk and the PCT reminded me about all of this. The news article at the link below talks about the accident.

      https://www.theolympian.com/latest-news/article218166455.html

      Rest in peace Laurie.

      Reply
  • September 29, 2020 at 8:24 pm
    Permalink

    As always, good pics by you, and story by Mavis. Thank you for the interesting content.

    Reply
    • September 30, 2020 at 10:02 am
      Permalink

      Thanks Greg.

      Reply
  • April 5, 2021 at 2:38 pm
    Permalink

    I hiked this section of the trail in 1985, read the plaque that told the story of Dana Yelverton’s death. I recall seeing a pile of stones and a cross nearby while hiking up the train towards the shelter. I was lucky to enjoy beautiful weather on that trip, so I slept near but not in it. I recall feeling very moved by the story and grateful that the sturdy shelter had been constructed.
    It was disappointing to return thirty years later with my daughter on a section hike of the PCT and find the shelter to be no more than a tumbling wall of rocks, the plaque nowhere to be found. As hikers these are the kinds of reminders we need, that mountains can be unforgiving, that weather can change. It was especially disconcerting to find no record of the event. I very much appreciate you sharing of this story. It provides some closure for me. Thank you.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Click here to Subscribe

Thanks for taking an interest in following me on my adventures. Enter your email address below and click the sign me up button. You should receive a confirmation email momentarily.